212. Restorative Development Regulations

Written by on February 29, 2012 in 2012 - 2 Comments
212 Sheridan way mural

 

 
“Agency is an argument that architecture needs to start doing things, not just provide form.”

 

Kaizer Rangwala is currently writing for Urban Planning and Economic Development News magazine. His latest article is titled “Restorative Development Regulations.”

Kaizer writes about different linear versus looped system developments. There is a lot of waste in the linear system, which requires many more resources than the looped system to produce the same product. Moreover, products produced by linear systems cannot be recycled or reused. Therefore, Kaizer argues strongly that we should move to a looped system. He proposes this move through urbanism. Form Base Code is a tool that can help change development regulations and move us closer to looped systems; it is an integrated framework for buildings, streets, open spaces, and public spaces.

The bottom line is that planners should start implementing looped systems in their work to help with limited resources and escalating pollution.

 

Letters from Listeners

This is an excellent article Kaizer — thank you and Arina I’d forgotten all about this little subgroup effort:
http://www.formbasedcodes.org/files/RestorativeDevelopmentRegulations.pdf

I would recommend trying out two “thought experiments” using the social “activist’s position” instead of, or in contrast to, the thick “econ-dev” jargon out there. Here are two very refreshing double bottom line, moral code tests that offer and interesting contrast for your ongoing analysis.

The first is:

The SEED (Social Economic Environmental Design) Network ( http://www.seednetwork.org ) (also a LinkedIn group) has become a clearinghouse of myriad community-based design projects around the globe, and it is one of hundreds of efforts engaged in a public-health version of architectural practice, focused not on the wealthy of the world who can pay design fees, or sponsor fancy project charrettes, but instead on everyone else who can’t and yet who need the services of designers as much or more than the top 1%.

The second that implements the loop or ReWealth cycle is this discussion of the standing planning, design and architecture has with regard to a moral or ethical code – in a nutshell it doesn’t have one. For more: http://designactivism.net/archives/284

It seems to me the progress you and so many other speak of must start within the activist’s realm for one reason carbon based development is not just a pattern of development that needs to change is a black hole. SEED and Design Activism and Community Design, Structures for Inclusion, Architecture for Humanity and so many others succumb to its pressures.

and this “what’s next” take via the Urban Times on ULI’s denial/acceptance take on development futures in Real Estate. Currently the code for this is “close in suburb”
http://www.theurbn.com/2012/02/whats-next-real-estate-in-the-new-economy

Rex Curry

This is an excellent article Kaizer — thank you and Arina I’d forgotten all about this little subgroup effort:
http://www.formbasedcodes.org/files/RestorativeDevelopmentRegulations.pdf

I would recommend trying out two “thought experiments” using the social “activist’s position” instead of, or in contrast to, the thick “econ-dev” jargon out there. Here are two very refreshing double bottom line, moral code tests that offer and interesting contrast for your ongoing analysis.

The first is:

The SEED (Social Economic Environmental Design) Network ( http://www.seednetwork.org ) (also a LinkedIn group) has become a clearinghouse of myriad community-based design projects around the globe, and it is one of hundreds of efforts engaged in a public-health version of architectural practice, focused not on the wealthy of the world who can pay design fees, or sponsor fancy project charrettes, but instead on everyone else who can’t and yet who need the services of designers as much or more than the top 1%.

The second that implements the loop or ReWealth cycle is this discussion of the standing planning, design and architecture has with regard to a moral or ethical code – in a nutshell it doesn’t have one. For more: http://designactivism.net/archives/284

It seems to me the progress you and so many other speak of must start within the activist’s realm for one reason carbon based development is not just a pattern of development that needs to change is a black hole. SEED and Design Activism and Community Design, Structures for Inclusion, Architecture for Humanity and so many others succumb to its pressures.

and this “what’s next” take via the Urban Times on ULI’s denial/acceptance take on development futures in Real Estate. Currently the code for this is “close in suburb”
http://www.theurbn.com/2012/02/whats-next-real-estate-in-the-new-economy
Posted by Rex Curry

2 Comments on "212. Restorative Development Regulations"

  1. GRETHEL CASTELLANOS March 6, 2012 at 2:39 pm ·

    I am very much interested in LOOPED SYSTEMS……HOW CAN I RECIEVE MORE INFORMATION ??

  2. Kaizer Rangwala March 7, 2012 at 10:42 pm ·

    Rex, Thank you for your insights and the resource links — I look forward to reviewing the contents.

    Grethel, A good resource on the looped system is William McDonough’s and Michael Braungart’s book Cradle to Cradle.

    Kaizer

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